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estrella-fuego:

heartsandsins:

brownglucose:

thehomiejazz:

becuzbacon:

Mia Morgan Sullivan was one of the greatest people any of us have ever known. Even though none of us wanted to believe she would be here, she knew. She knew she would. She made sure that we would all be here, too. Not to mourn death, but to celebrate life. Being with her in the days leading to her home-going was the greatest gift any of us have ever received. Because of her, we are friends for life. Because of her… we’re family. Mia was, and is an angel. It’s tragically ironic that the day we recieved the Son of God, he called one of his daughters home. I know that God has a plan. I know. But this one… This one is really hard to accept. 

This movie ruined me

I cried so hard. That shit hit home

I knew she was gone die but I still cried hysterically in the theatre.

this movie fucked me all up…. i saw it in theaters and had to sit there a while after it ended to get it together… i was like… it was hard.

I don’t think I could go through watching it again. That shit had me bawling.

nah-gee:

tittyenthusiast:

was supposed to leave my house 15 minutes ago

still pretty much nekkid

image

This stay me

poyzn:

Quick and simple lifehacks.

sixpenceee:

How does this make you feel? 

I KNOW RIGHT. 

Watch the full short film here

dante + styles  (sword master - royal guard - gunslinger - trickster)

resurgance:

IM FUKING SCREAMING OMG

Fifty years ago, thousands of young people organized the Mississippi Summer Project, a historic attempt to register black voters in Mississippi, which, at the time, had the lowest black registration rate in the country. Some civil rights workers were killed. Hundreds were beaten. But Freedom Summer, as it’s now known, transformed the national narrative surrounding civil rights by ushering in a new wave of laws that would guarantee equality at the ballot box.

Today, America is at another crossroads in civil rights. People of color represent two-thirds of our incarcerated population. Gun homicide is the leading cause of death among black teenagers. Schools are again re-segregating. Race is still a roadblock in America. We face a stalled Congress, unable to protect our founding values that we are all created equal. And we sit in the looming shadow of a Supreme Court, whose blind eye toward race is equally blind to our inalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, as shown from recent decisions limiting contraception coverage, hurting public employee unions, rolling back voting rights, and increasing the influence of big money in politics.

We, the millennial generation, cannot be “colorblind.” We must choose the path of change.

Young people must create a new civil rights movement to fight systemic inequality  (via micdotcom)

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